Category: dougie jones

Kyle MacLachlan: Yes, Even I Was Confused by D…

Kyle MacLachlan: Yes, Even I Was Confused by David Lynch’s Return to #TwinPeaks  

TheWrap Emmy magazine: “David didn’t feel the least bit compelled to revisit what we knew from before,” MacLachlan says of his encore appearance as Agent Cooper

This story about Kyle MacLachlan first appeared in the Miniseries/Movies issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

Anybody who watched TV in the early 1990s remembers Agent Dale Cooper. A quirky but buttoned-down FBI agent with a taste for damn fine coffee and apple pie, he led an investigation into the murder of high schooler Laura Palmer in the town of Twin Peaks, Washington, population 51,201.

Strange things happened to Agent Cooper and everyone around him in David Lynch’s groundbreaking series “Twin Peaks,” which ran for two seasons and later gave birth to the 1992 film “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me” and, last year, a much-delayed third season that ran for 18 hour-long episodes on Showtime.

Even more than his starring role in Lynch’s movie “Blue Velvet,” Agent Cooper is the character most closely linked with Kyle MacLachlan over the course of the actor’s 34-year career. So when Lynch announced that he would bring back “Twin Peaks” for an additional season, the chance to spend more time with MacLachlan’s iconic G-man was a real draw not just for fans of the series, but for the actor himself.

“When I initially heard that David was interested in returning to ‘Twin Peaks,’ I was obviously excited to get back to work and to return to the character,” said MacLachlan. “But then we had to wait for 16 hours before he actually emerged.”

Such are the ways of Lynch, who delayed the arrival of the Cooper we know and love until almost the end of the series. But that doesn’t mean he didn’t give MacLachlan lots of stuff to do before that: The actor also plays Mr. C, Cooper’s evil doppelgänger; Douglas “Dougie” Jones, a second, manufactured doppelgänger and a man-child of sorts vaguely reminiscent of the Peter Sellers character in “Being There”; and various versions of Cooper possessed by the evil spirit BOB and trapped, dazed, in the mysterious Black Lodge.

“At first I imagined that David was going to be doing something along the lines of what he did before,” said MacLachlan, who had remained close friends with Lynch after their early work on 1984’s “Dune,” 1986’s “Blue Velvet” and the original “Twin Peaks.”

“But very early on, he gave me some scenes to read at his house, and I couldn’t believe the premises. I was really excited and challenged by what I was being asked to do — because these are characters that I had never done before, and if I don’t deliver at the level that David is expecting, it’s not going to work. But at the same time, I had confidence in working under David’s vision.”

That confidence, he explained, had been developed over the years with Lynch. “When we first started working together on ‘Dune,’ I used to go to David all the time with questions about the script,” he said. “I was a big fan of the book, so I was at his office door every day saying, ‘Can we put this back in? What about this?’ He was very tolerant with me, and when we worked together again on ‘Blue Velvet’ I still had questions and thoughts.

“But over the years I just kind of relaxed. There are still times when I need to know things as an actor, but he doesn’t spend a lot of time explaining nor do I spend a lot of time asking. I know things are there because David wants them to be. He’s the leader and we are all just in line.”

For the new “Twin Peaks,” MacLachlan thinks that Lynch’s point of reference was closer to the aggressively confounding movie “Fire Walk With Me” than the original series, which grew stranger over its two seasons but was based on a murder-mystery storyline and an eccentric but lovable cast of characters.

“It was a different tone, maintaining some of the heartwarming moments from the original television show but certainly not dwelling on them,” he said. “In those first few scenes that David gave me to read, I recognized that this was not a nostalgic return to ‘Twin Peaks.’ I realized that David and [co-creator] Mark [Frost] didn’t feel the least bit compelled to revisit what we knew from before.”

Of the new characters MacLachlan played, Mr. C was in many ways the most sinister and compelling. An implacable bad guy prone to dispassionate murders, the Cooper doppelgänger also had a tinge of rock star to him.

“One of David’s favorite directions is, ‘A little more Elvis,‘” said MacLachlan. “Mr. C definitely has a little bit of that vibe — it’s Johnny Cash, it’s Elvis, it’s that kind of dark knight.

“David and I slowly cobbled together the look of that guy, recognizing that as much as he exists in our world, he’s also an otherworldly entity of some kind. As an actor, that’s my playground, and we both had a lot of fun with that character.”

Dougie, though, was tougher, because he was almost entirely passive. “The tool I have to work with, my body, was almost nonexistent,” he said. “Things had to be communicated in the most nuanced and quiet way. I really trusted David, because I had to say to him, ‘Are you sure you’re seeing it? Is it there?’ It was a real lesson in less is more, and you also have to rely on the actors around you.”

But there was one scene, MacLachlan said, where the actors around him caused real problems. It came when Mr. C was in jail and was visited by Agent Cooper’s longtime assistant Diane Evans and by FBI director Gordon Cole. The problem was that Evans was being played by MacLachlan’s “Blue Velvet” co-star Laura Dern, and Cole by Lynch himself.

“They are two of my closest friends,” he said. “I’m so used to the dynamic that exists when we’re not working that to do something in that environment with those people was disconcerting.

“One of the elements of Mr. C is that there is no connection — he is a force, and that’s it. There is no common ground with anybody else because he dominates the space. Those are such different emotions than I was used to feeling with those people that it was challenging to maintain.”

Still, he said, he never lost the “I can’t believe I’m back doing this” feeling during the marathon 10-month shoot. “I thought that every day going to work,” he said. “I did not take a single moment for granted. I relished everything, and that includes getting up at 4 a.m., getting my coffee and driving to work.”

And when MacLachlan looks back over a career that has also included such films as “The Doors,” “Showgirls” and “Inside Out” and the TV shows “Portlandia,” “Believe” and “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” he can’t help but recognize how key Lynch has been to his success. “David has been incredibly significant for me,” he said. “And it’s something that over time I have come to appreciate more and more.

“In some ways, I think I was the very model of a callow, self-absorbed young actor when I was first starting out. And thankfully that has melted away, and I have tremendous appreciation for what David and I have done together and what David has done for me.”

So will he and Lynch get together again for another series of adventures for Agent Cooper and his various doppelgängers? “I have no sense of that at all,” MacLachlan said.

“David is notoriously quiet about what he sees coming, what he wants to do next. I’ve spoken to him about it a bit, but he absolutely won’t say anything.”

Link : (The Wrap)

@Kyle_MacLachlan Quick reminder, if you’re vot…

@Kyle_MacLachlan Quick reminder, if you’re voting from the Black Lodge this year, be sure to mark your ballot from back to front. @TelevisionAcad #TwinPeaks #SHOemmyFYC #LimitedSeries

https://youtu.be/spgHqAOVrUY

audreycooper:

audreycooper:

Twin Peaks: The Return (2017)
Season 3, Part 3 
dir. David Lynch 

@SHO_PR Congratulations to @Kyle_MacLachlan on…

@SHO_PR Congratulations to @Kyle_MacLachlan on his Dorian Award win for TV Performance of the Year – Actor! #TwinPeaks

2018 Golden Globes: Kyle MacLachlan Was Robbed…

2018 Golden Globes: Kyle MacLachlan Was Robbed

By  Maggie Serota

I don’t mean to disparage Ewan McGregor’s Golden Globes win for Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture for Television. His competition was stacked with titans like Robert De Niro for his Bernie Madoff portrayal, Geoffrey Rush for his horny Einstein depiction, and to a lesser extent, Jude Law for his performance as a petulant pope. McGregor also had to play two complicated characters with a complicated familial relationship for the third season of the consistently excellent FX series Fargo, which is no small feat—just ask McGregor’s fellow nominee Kyle MacLachlan.

MacLachlan undertook the herculean task of playing three (or maybe four?) characters in Twin Peaks: The Return, and with each character, he had to render something vastly different. For Agent Dale Cooper’s evil Mr. C. doppelgänger—which ended up resembling a tall, slender Glenn Danzig—MacLachlan had to be legitimately terrifying: a supernatural villain that could watch its son get fried to death by an otherworldly energy portal and barely shrug.

For the nearly catatonic husk of an Agent Cooper who was finally propelled from the Black Lodge and into the life of Dougie Jones—a gambling, womanizing, insurance salesman who had fallen in with the Las Vegas criminal underworld—MacLachlan displayed an almost surgically precise sense of comic timing, especially when it came to physical comedy. The character was barely verbal, but MacLachlan turned in an almost Chaplin-esque silent movie portrayal of Jones, save for repeating the last word of phrase of dialogue spoken to him.

What’s remarkable about MacLachlan’s performance was that he didn’t have to speak to let the viewer know that the old Coop was back. The FBI agent’s return was communicated with the urgency with which he sat up in his hospital bed and pulled off the various tubes and sensors before issuing polite, but firm commands.

Almost as soon as the audience was re-acquanted with the old Coop, it had to say goodbye to him and get to know a more severe and detached version to the character once he and Laura Dern’s Diane stepped through room 315 at The Great Northern.

MacLachlan won a Golden Globe for his portrayal of Agent Cooper in 1991 when the role was hemmed in by the constraints of network television. Almost 27 years later, the return of the cult classic show was all but shut out of the awards ceremony. Perhaps the fact that MacLachlan was the only person to get a nod this time around was a tacit admission of the complexity of his performance. Perhaps Twin Peaks: The Return was too weird, non-linear, and experimental for the Hollywood Foreign Press to properly appreciate, but what MacLachlan accomplished within that framework was too impressive to ignore, even if it wasn’t formally awarded

Link (TP)

Thanks for feeding me. – @Kyle_MacLachlan  #Tw…

Thanks for feeding me. – @Kyle_MacLachlan  #TwinPeaks #DougieJones  

The 50 Best TV Performances of 2017 The work d…

The 50 Best TV Performances of 2017

The work done by David Lynch, Kyle MacLachlan, Harry Dean Stanton, and Miguel Ferrer in Twin Peaks surpasses the confines of categorization, and in turn, offered unexpected delights in speech and physicality. 

MacLachlan deserves extra points for portraying a great villain in Mr. C, as well as Dougie Jones and Dale Cooper.

The full article and list is here : (TP)

@DAVID_LYNCH and @Kyle_MacLachlan on the set o…

@DAVID_LYNCH and @Kyle_MacLachlan on the set of #TwinPeaks:The Return

Chunky Dougie is so adorable, I want to give him a hug and rub his belly. 🤣🤣

#TwinPeaks  “David was really specific w…

#TwinPeaks  “David was really specific with me about how he wanted Cooper to move and look in those last few beats.” @Kyle_MacLachlan looks back on  @SHO_TwinPeaks

Toast of 2017: Kyle MacLachlan shares the secrets of ‘Twin Peaks: The Return’

Twenty-five years after its alternately brilliant and befuddling series finale, David Lynch and Mark Frost’s singular creation, Twin Peaks, returned to television for a summertime encore that, appropriately enough, wound up raising more questions than it answered. What’s the significance of the atomic bomb imagery? What happened to Audrey? Is Carrie Page really Laura Palmer? And then there’s the most important question of all: is Twin Peaks: The Return a TV series or a movie? Although it aired weekly on Showtime in 18 hour-long installments, two prestigious film magazines — Sight & Sound and Cahiers du Cinéma — ranked the series among their best movies of 2017, setting off a firestorm of debate on Twitter. True to form, Lynch has deliberately avoided engaging in this heated discussion, although he did fan the flames early on, telling Rolling Stone prior to the show’s launch in May that that he approached The Return as an “18-hour film.”

As it turns out, Lynch’s leading man, Kyle MacLachlan, mostly agrees with his longtime collaborator on The Return‘s designation in the TV vs. film debate. “It’s tricky, because it’s a hybrid,” the actor tells Yahoo Entertainment. “David wrote it and directed it as if it were an 18-hour film, and was very specific in saying, ‘Don’t call them episodes; just call them hours.’ And at the end of an hour’s worth of viewing, he would just segue into something else, usually a performance at the Roadhouse, as a way to give it the feel of an ending. So I think the idea was that it would be viewed as one long film. But the debate is interesting! We’ll have to come up with a new category.”

While we’re in the process of inventing new categories for Twin Peaks, let’s not neglect finding fresh ways to honor MacLachlan’s performance. Besides reprising his iconic role as the coffee-and-cherry-pie-loving FBI agent Dale Cooper, the actor creates two (and maybe more) versions of his alter ego, including the Cooper who’s trapped in the otherworldly Red Room, as well as his evil doppelgänger, who has been loose in the real world for the past quarter-century. And then there’s Doug Jones — Dougie to his friends — a Las Vegas insurance agent whose face and form is borrowed by Cooper after he exits the Red Room but before he regains full consciousness. In MacLachlan’s hands, each of these characters emerges as a distinct individual with strikingly different physicalities and personality traits. He recently received a Golden Globe nomination for his multifaceted work, but perhaps he deserves three nods, or, failing that, an entirely new statue. In a lively chat for our year-end Toast of 2017 series, he shared his theory about what the final shot of The Return, means and the strange art of playing a newborn in an adult body.

Yahoo TV: I’d like to start at the very end of Twin Peaks: The Return — specifically that haunting final scene before the credits where Cooper brings Carrie Page, the woman he thinks is Laura Palmer, back home to Twin Peaks. What went through your mind when you first read that sequence on the page?

Kyle MacLachlan: I was really moved by it. I had the same reaction to that as I had when I read the end of the original pilot. I don’t know if you recall but the very first time Twin Peaks was on air, there was a gloved hand that reaches into the frame and picks up a gold necklace, and you hear Grace [Zabriskie, who plays Laura Palmer’s mother, Sarah] screaming in the background, and there’s a quick cut. It’s very disturbing, and lifts you out of your seat. I had exactly the same thought here. We shot that scene very early on in shooting The Return; it was while we were up in Seattle, which was during the first five or six weeks of filming. We hadn’t gotten to everything else, and it’s always a bit discombobulating to play something early in the filming that’s going to be placed at the end.

David was really specific with me about how he wanted Cooper to move and look in those last few beats. And it was quite easy to react with shock when Sheryl Lee [who plays Laura and Carrie] is screaming in the middle of the night in a Seattle suburb! It made the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Also, having the owner of the house there at the door. That’s part of David’s brilliance; he enlists people that he feels have the right kind of energy. As I was playing it, I felt this slow draining of confidence. Confidence is such a part of Cooper’s DNA — it was seeping out from his pores. But one of the things about that particular Cooper is that he’s slightly different than the Dale that wakes up in the hospital; he’s another tick on the character dial away from the original Cooper. So there was a loss of control and I felt very helpless. All of those thoughts and feelings were playing in that scene, but how it was going to fit into the whole of Twin Peaks I didn’t know yet. I didn’t know what the impact was going to be, and it turned out to be very powerful.

So much of the series rests on the delayed gratification of seeing the return of the original Cooper. Were you similarly impatient to play him again?

Yeah, I did want to get back to him. During filming, I would occasionally think, “We’re really going to test the patience of our fanbase!” But I also admired the kind of commitment that David has to his vision. We never spoke about getting back to the real Cooper more quickly, but he obviously felt it was important to maintain that tension about whether he’ll come back or not. It also allowed the character of Dougie Jones to also really take hold, and I think people really began to fall in love with him. Then it became, “We love Dale Cooper, but we also love Dougie Jones. Only one or the other is probably going to survive here, and we don’t know which!” It was one of those tricky things that, in hindsight, was actually pretty great. And David was able to put a little cherry on top when Dougie returns home as a slightly more capable version of the original.

Just within our office, we had a bet going about when Cooper was going to return. At one point, I said that we weren’t going to see him until the last episode.
I do feel like Episode 16 — when Cooper arrives and everything is kind of resolved, to a point — is the end of one long beat. And then with Episode 17 and 18, you transition into something else — almost a new story and new direction. It’s a new quest, I guess, that’s sort of separate from what we’ve been watching before.

How much freedom did Lynch give you to create your different identities as Dougie, Bad Cooper, Red Room Cooper, and so on?

We found them together. Bad Cooper took a little bit of time, because David and I were approaching that character as organically as possible. There’s always the temptation to immediately say, “Oh, he’s this kind of guy, he wears this kind of stuff and he looks this kind of way,” just establish him quickly so you don’t feel the discomfort of not knowing. But every time we work together, we let the character find his way. With Bad Coop, we started with, “What is he like inside and how is that gonna be reflected in the way he moves and looks?” There were times where we wondered whether he was going to be put together and impeccably dressed, but then we let the character find his way — to the point of having dirt on his face and hands and not caring about it. There were also discussions about jewelry and other types of minutia — things that are incredibly boring to anybody not involved in creating this character but very important when you’re trying to make a character come to life from the page.

It was the same with Dougie. David knows I have a certain facility with physical comedy, and he wanted that to be magnified. So you take Cooper, and you distill him down into a new being. What is it like to be put in a body in a world where you don’t know anything? It’s almost like taking a newborn and putting it into an adult body. We had a lot of fun with the challenge of that. You have to have a lot of patience and a lot of confidence as an actor that what you’re doing is going to hold up, because there were a lot of moments where there didn’t seem to be a whole lot going on with Dougie. You just have to trust that it’s going to work; there was a big commitment to that character having that stillness.

How much freedom did Lynch give you to create your different identities as Dougie, Bad Cooper, Red Room Cooper, and so on?
We found them together. Bad Cooper took a little bit of time, because David and I were approaching that character as organically as possible. There’s always the temptation to immediately say, “Oh, he’s this kind of guy, he wears this kind of stuff and he looks this kind of way,” just establish him quickly so you don’t feel the discomfort of not knowing. But every time we work together, we let the character find his way. With Bad Coop, we started with, “What is he like inside and how is that gonna be reflected in the way he moves and looks?” There were times where we wondered whether he was going to be put together and impeccably dressed, but then we let the character find his way — to the point of having dirt on his face and hands and not caring about it. There were also discussions about jewelry and other types of minutia — things that are incredibly boring to anybody not involved in creating this character but very important when you’re trying to make a character come to life from the page.

It was the same with Dougie. David knows I have a certain facility with physical comedy, and he wanted that to be magnified. So you take Cooper, and you distill him down into a new being. What is it like to be put in a body in a world where you don’t know anything? It’s almost like taking a newborn and putting it into an adult body. We had a lot of fun with the challenge of that. You have to have a lot of patience and a lot of confidence as an actor that what you’re doing is going to hold up, because there were a lot of moments where there didn’t seem to be a whole lot going on with Dougie. You just have to trust that it’s going to work; there was a big commitment to that character having that stillness.

Even though you’re a much-respected character actor, it feels like The Return has been a reintroduction of sorts. Audiences seem to have come away from the series with a new appreciation for your range as a performer.

I was very excited to be able to do a different thing as an actor. That’s one of the things I pursue, and the opportunity to play not one, but three or maybe four very different characters was challenging and exciting. David knows that I’m the guy for Cooper — he can’t go and find somebody else! But if he’s going to write something where I’m going to have to do other things that he’s not necessarily seen me do before, but in his heart believes that I can do, that’s a humbling thing. I don’t know if I would have been capable of doing this 10 years ago or even 25 years ago when we first did the show. As an actor, you like to think that you’re evolving and getting better and getting better at your craft. So I feel like this was an opportunity for me to do some interesting work, and if I’m going to have to do things that I’ve not done before, there’s nobody better to do it with than David because he knows me the best and I could completely trust his eye.

You mentioned the physical comedy aspect to playing Dougie Jones earlier, and many of those scenes did remind me of silent film comedians like Charlie Chaplin.
Thank you, that’s great. I’m a big fan of Chaplin, and Harold Lloyd as well. If you go back and look at the movie The Hidden — which, geez, was in the late ’80s, I guess! — I got to do a similar kind of thing. There’s an alien that’s inhabiting a human body for the very first time in that movie. But it takes the eyes of David Lynch to give the courage to just let something run. There were a lot of times in Twin Peaks where we just rolled camera, and I did what felt right to me. Then, with the encouragement of David, I’d go even further thinking, “I’m going to trust that he’s got my back on this.” And we came up with some great stuff.

Having worked with him so long, what’s the thing about David Lynch that would surprise people the most?
That he’s got a wonderful sense of humor, terrific patience, and joy in the creative process. He’s very welcoming of an actor’s input, but at the same time very specific about what he’s looking for and what he’s not looking for. And he’s so rooted in reality and in the moment; it’s important to him that he absolutely believes that the actor is that character in that situation. There are just so many things about who he is — I could go on and on. When I look back over the years, I started with David Lynch in Dune, and then I also did my second movie with David Lynch, Blue Velvet. Being young, naïve and callow, I think I felt, “That was good, but now I’m gonna go work with these guys over here.” That depth of appreciation [for David] that didn’t necessarily exist when I was in my early 20s has come up and out, and I love the man so much. To have worked with him as many times as I have and to have done some of my best work with him has been a big part of the journey for me as an actor.

Looking ahead to what’s after Twin Peaks, what have you taken away from the show that you hope to apply to your next role?
My process hasn’t changed much. I want to do interesting things with interesting filmmakers, and something that makes sense to me as an actor in the moment. In some ways, these performances have given me more confidence in what I’m able to do, a stronger belief in myself. And it has nothing to do with the reviews or anything like that; if I see it in my own performance, I’m comfortable with it. And I did see it in my performance in Twin Peaks. I was like, “You’ve grown, Kyle. There are things that you can do that I didn’t even know you could do.”

Twin Peaks: The Return is streaming on Showtime Anytime and on Hulu with a Showtime subscription.

link (TP)

@SHO_TwinPeaks  Guess who made the list?! #Twi…

@SHO_TwinPeaks  Guess who made the list?! #TwinPeaks #Showtime

The 15 Best New TV Characters of 2017

Diane (Laura Dern), Twin Peaks: The Return

Yes, this is the second Dern character on this list—but that should come as no surprise given 2017 could, unofficially, be termed the Year of Dern. The pressure of delivering on a classic Twin Peaks character, one who had been addressed but never seen in the original series, was enormous. How could any actual performance live up to our imaginations when it came to Agent Dale Cooper’s faithful secretary, Diane? But from the moment Dern’s bewigged Diane slowly spun around on her barstool, all earlier fantasies of that character immediately vanished. Acerbic, damaged, hyper-stylized, alcoholic, real and not, Diane was about as far from your typical girl Friday as one could get.

Dougie Jones (Kyle MacLachlan), Twin Peaks: The Return

When Twin Peaks first returned to screens after more than 25 years away, all audiences thought they wanted out of MacLachlan was another round of his Boy Scout F.B.I. agent, Dale Cooper. What that unpredictable imp David Lynch gave us, instead, was almost an entire season of an addled man-child creature wearing Cooper’s face, who answered (vaguely) to the name “Dougie Jones.” This character was meant to reveal more about the world around him than he was to take us on an inward journey to his soul. His constant confusion frustrated some, but a funny thing happened on the way to the return of Dale Cooper. Dougie Jones, so pure of spirit, somehow worked his way into our hearts—and when Coop finally woke up to himself and his version of Dougie left forever, well, it was one of the saddest “deaths” on television in 2017.

LINK (TP)